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Join me, Stacey Resnikoff, Lauren Grodstein and moderator Kelly MacFarland at the French Cultural Center, 53 Marlborough Street, Boston, MA at 4 pm for our BBF event, Writing in Paris. Here is the link to the event: http://bit.ly/2ytRfoJ

Why There are Words presents: Adventure, and I will be reading about Morocco, with Erin Byrne, Kimberley Lovato, and others on November 9m 2017 at 7 pm.

Here is the link to the event: http://www.whytherearewords.com/2017/10/14/why-there-are-words-presents-adventure-in-sausalito-november-9/

 

 

This was quite a bit of fun, to have the chance to speak with Pauline and Arthur Frommer about 100 Places in France on ABC Radio – the same day as my friend and colleague Lavinia Spalding. My interview, April 9 hour 1, here.

Last year, I wrote an essay about my mother and her love of Morocco. This week, it won a Lowell Thomas Award from the Society of American Travel Writers in the Personal Comment category. It’s my fifth essay that has been honored by the SATW, and it gets more exciting every time. Here’s what the judges said: 1-SATWFoundation_2012_jpg

Silver: Marcia DeSanctis, “Time or the Sahara Wind,” Tales To Go
A photo album brings back memories not only of trips taken but also, as importantly, of the photographer herself — the writer’s mother, who now is lost in the mists of Alzheimer’s. This personal and poignant story reminds readers of the fragility of life.

Again, the photo in the story.

Again, the photo in the story.

This is me, back then.

This is me, back then.


I’ve been asked a lot lately how I became a travel writer. The answer is, by accident. But it was this story – about a woman I met in Moscow, a memoir from the Cold War – that launched my career. I submitted it everywhere (and I mean everywhere – one fancy editor said, “There’s not enough to it,” when he passed) and finally, it was accepted by the literary magazine, The Coachella Review. Then, someone suggested I submit it to Best Women’s Travel Writing, Travelers’ Tales essential series that should be required reading for all budding travel writers. I never thought of it as a travel story, but I since have learned that travel writing defies categorization and comes in all shapes and sizes. I wrote a version that was quite a bit longer and updated to reflect a recent trip to Moscow, and it was accepted for the anthology. That year, it won a Solas Grand award for Best Travel Story of the Year. Then, Masha won a Lowell Thomas Award for Essay/Personal Comment from the Society of American Travel Writers, and last, was published on Geoex by my friend and fellow writer, Don George. In short, Masha launched my career.

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I write about this photo – me long ago in Morocco – in my story ‘Time or the Sahara Wind.’ Scroll down, way down: this essay won a Gold Solas Award for travel memoir – my favorite category, in fact. It’s an honor. I’d like to thank…….Travelers’ Tales/Solas House for keeping the travel essay alive, thriving and prospering.

The essay was published in “Tales to Go” and will be included in a book of essays abut Morocco, edited by my friend Erin Byrne.

Candace Rose Rardon. Lavinia Spalding, Lisa Alpine, Don George, and I. Photo @ M. Terry Bowman

Candace Rose Rardon. Lavinia Spalding, Lisa Alpine, Don George, and I. Photo @ M. Terry Bowman

I don’t get to San Francisco enough, but when I go, I always hope to stop by Book Passage in Corte Madera – and even better, to do an event there. My friend, the lovely writer Lisa Alpine, hosts a series and in June 2015, I did a reading with my great friends and colleagues Lavinia Spalding and Candace Rose Rardon. Here is a YouTube video of the event – Thanks Lisa and Book Passage for another fulfilling night of books and stories.

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Very pleased that my essay about the unexpected pleasure of traveling through France alone has won a Lowell Thomas Award for personal comment. I’m in great company: Here is a list of the winners, and here, again, is my story. And this is what the judges said:

Marcia DeSanctis’ strong, first-person narrative captures what one is supposed to feel for France: recognition of its unquestioned cultural and culinary preeminence. Yet, because she inverts the expectations of the accompanied traveler, she introduces us to a flawed, humane and solitary France. The accompanied traveler carries the awareness of another; the solo traveler converses only with memories. DeSanctis captures the joy of not sharing canelés (traditional pastries of Bordeaux) and the freedom to live extemporaneously. “I was travelling alone,” she writes with a spark of recognition “but not a single thing was missing.”